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Injury and Violence Prevention Branch

Suicide Prevention

2015 N.C. Suicide Prevention Plan

2015 North Carolina Suicide Prevention PlanThe 2015 N.C. Suicide Prevention Plan (PDF, 4.1 MB) is the result of a collaborative 16-month process among staff members within the Division of Public Health’s Injury and Violence Prevention Branch, the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health’s Department of Health Behavior, and the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services. Utilizing the input of approximately 180 diverse suicide prevention stakeholders, the plan’s primary purpose is to empower all North Carolinians with knowledge and to highlight examples of the actions they can take to reduce suicide. An Executive Summary (PDF, 1.4 MB) of the plan and a presentation of data (PDF, 676 KB) included in the plan are also available.

 General Suicide Prevention Information

Suicide Prevention Overview

Suicides can be prevented by recognizing signs and symptoms, learning how to help, and taking steps to provide that help to people in need. The statewide program working to address suicide is located within the Injury and Violence Prevention Branch of the North Carolina Division of Public Health. The program works to facilitate partnerships that can address this serious public health problem across different populations.

What is suicide?

Suicide occurs when a person ends their life. For people in North Carolina between the ages of 15 and 34 it is the third leading cause of death. Suicide deaths are only part of the problem. More people survive suicide attempts than actually die. They are often seriously injured and need medical care. Most people feel uncomfortable talking about suicide. Often, victims are blamed. Their friends, families, and communities are left devastated.

What are the risk factors for suicide?

According to the CDC, several factors can put a person at risk for attempting or committing suicide. But, having these risk factors does not always mean that suicide will occur. Risk factors for suicide include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • History of depression or other mental illness
  • Alcohol or drug abuse
  • Family history of suicide or violence
  • Physical illness
  • Feeling alone

Note: These are only some of the risk factors. To learn more, visit the CDC's risk and protective factors and suicide prevention pages.

 Youth Suicide Prevention

Suicides can be prevented by recognizing signs and symptoms, learning how to help, and taking steps to provide that help to people in need. The statewide program working to address suicide is within the Injury and Violence Prevention Branch of the North Carolina Division of Public Health. The program works to facilitate partnerships that can address this serious public health problem across different populations.

Suicide Prevention Initiatives

Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act Youth Suicide Prevention Program, addressing suicide among 10-24 year olds in North Carolina. The grant led to creation of the "It's OK 2 Ask" website and provides suicide prevention trainings to communities.

Resources